Fast Fact

Three out of four people who default never completed their schooling.

Source: Financial Aid Finder, 2009

Default

If you do not have a deferment or forbearance and you don't make any loan payments for 270 days on a federal loan or 120 days on an alternative loan (although it may be more or less, depending on the lender), your lender/loan servicer will take steps to place the loan in default.

Don't let this happen!

Default can have devastating consequences:

The U.S. Department of Education or your lender may take legal action against you to force repayment of your debt.

What if your loan is already in default?

Help is available. Federal loans that have defaulted are eligible for a "rehabilitation" program. To successfully complete rehabilitation of your loan, you must:

Once your loan is rehabilitated, it is no longer in a default status:

Please note that a loan may be rehabilitated only one time.

Contact your lender/loan holder to find out the details and get started on the path to rehabilitation or visit StudentAid.ed.gov. You want to get your loans in good standing and resolve the default on your credit report as soon as possible.

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